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Rabbit’s Gold: Discover these 15 Valuable By-Products of Rabbits

Rabbits, belonging to the Leporidae family, are charming and small mammals that encompass a diverse range of species, from wild rabbits found in natural habitats to domesticated ones that we often keep as our beloved pets.

They are bred in many parts of the world for various purposes, notably as sources of meat, fur, and skin due to their exceptional qualities

Beyond these well-known products, there exists a fascinating array of rabbit by-products that often go unnoticed.

Here is a quick list of the lesser-known rabbit by-products and their uses:

1. Rabbit Fur

Rabbit fur is used as an addition to hats and coats, providing both warmth and an enhanced aesthetic appeal.

The fiber derived from sheared rabbit hair is further employed in the production of knitting yarn, woven fabrics, and various knitted goods, showcasing its versatility in the textile industry.

2. Rabbit Pelt / Skin

Rabbit pelts or skins, valued for their warmth and softness, are used to make blankets, hats, gloves, and toys.

Rabbit hide can also be used to make bedspreads and pillowcases.

3. Rabbit Urine

Rabbit urine is used in farming as a pest repellent because of its smell.

Apart from as a pesticide, it can also be used as organic fertilizer. It is diluted in water before use since it can damage plant roots.

Rabbit urine is sold at reasonable prices across the country.

Learn more here: From Waste to Resource: The Potential of Rabbit Urine as a Fertilizer in Kenya

4. Rabbit Meat

Rabbit meat is nutritious. It contains proteins, iron, vitamin B-12, Selenium, and a reasonable amount of calories.

When properly prepared and cooked, this white meat is tasty and is especially recommended for pregnant and nursing mothers because of its high nutritional value.

5. Rabbit Ears

Rabbit ears are excellent dog snacks due to their rich nutritional content.

In addition to their high nutritional value, they contribute to the overall health of your dog by aiding in deworming and promoting healthy digestion.

The fiber present in the hair of rabbit ears gently brushes against the dog’s intestines and anal glands, helping to prevent blockages and digestive problems.

So, by incorporating rabbit ears into your dog’s diet, you can provide them with a tasty treat while also supporting their well-being and digestive health.

6. Rabbit Offal

Rabbit offal encompasses all the internal organs, giblets, and tender parts of the rabbit.

While it is commonly fed to pets, in certain countries and cultures, these parts are ground and utilized as ingredients in sausages and stuffings.

Additionally, when properly prepared, rabbit offal can also be cooked and served as a standalone dish.

Its unique flavors and textures make it a versatile component in culinary traditions around the world.

7. Rabbit Skin Glue

Rabbit skin glue, available in both powder form and larger chunks, serves as a valuable adhesive for binding wood fibers.

Unlike PVA glue, rabbit skin glue does not deteriorate or wear off with time.

Its protein content permeates deeply into the wood, intertwining with the pores and ensuring a durable bond.

Additionally, rabbit skin glue finds utility as a sizing agent in painting. When applied, it tightens the canvas as it dries, providing a taut surface for the paint application.

8. Rabbit Brain

Cats love rabbit brain so much because it is highly nutritious compared to any other part of the body. The brain is edible to humans as well.

 It is also used as a tanning agent for rabbit pelts, where it is employed in the process to help preserve and condition the fur.

9. Rabbit Droppings

Once dried, rabbit droppings can be utilized as water fertilizer in fishing ponds.

They also find application in mulching, serving as a top dressing for plants, and are beneficial when incorporated into the soil as a form of manure.

Unlike other animal waste, rabbit droppings are regarded as ‘cold’ manure as they do not require a significant amount of time to dry and decompose before being used as fertilizer.

This makes them a convenient and efficient option for enriching the soil and promoting healthy plant growth.

10. Rabbit Blood

Rabbit blood is incorporated into chicken feeds to elevate protein levels, serving as a potential substitute for ‘omena’ (silver cyprinid) to enhance chicken yield.

Rabbit blood is also employed as a soil additive in farming practices.

For those who consume blood-based products, rabbit blood can be utilized in chicken sauces, as well as in the preparation of blood pudding and blood sausages, adding distinct flavors and nutritional value to these culinary creations.

11. Rabbit Paws

In some countries, rabbit foot is used to make amulets believed to bring good luck.

These amulets are made in the form of keychains and necklaces.

 However, a more common use of rabbit paws is as dog food. Their high nutrition content makes them good for improving joint and dental health in dogs.

12. Rabbit Bones

When immersed in water, rabbit bones yield a nutritious stock. This flavorful broth can be used as a substitute for water in various cooking recipes, infusing the food with a rich, meaty taste.

For individuals with a craving for bone soup, rabbit stock can be enjoyed on its own, whether seasoned with spices or sipped without any additional flavorings.

13. Rabbit Tail

Like rabbit paws, rabbit tail is used to make ornaments believed to bring good charm in some parts of the world. It is considered a representation of purity, innocence, and a fresh start.

Rabbit tails make keychains, neck pieces, and decorative wall hangings.

14. Rabbit Milk

Did you know that rabbit milk is good for human consumption?

Though it contains higher sodium levels and isn’t as tasty as a cow or goat milk, rabbit milk is highly nutritious.

It has low levels of lactose, making it suitable for lactose-intolerant humans.

Rabbit milk is also being used in medicine for hemophilia treatment. Its unique properties make it valuable in providing potential therapeutic benefits for individuals with this condition.

15. Laboratory Animals

Rabbits also serve as valuable subjects in laboratory research due to their physiological similarities to humans, making them suitable for studying various diseases, drug development, toxicology, and biomedical research.

Their use enables scientists to gain insights into human health and develop potential treatments and interventions for human conditions.

Agnes Nabukenya

Agnes Nabukenya is a highly experienced Agricultural Extension Officer with over 10 years of experience in the field. He has a deep understanding of farming practices in Kenya and is passionate about helping small-scale farmers improve their crop yields and overall livelihoods. Nabukenya has a Bachelor's degree in Agriculture from Egerton University and a Master's degree in Agricultural Extension from the University of Nairobi. He has also received several certifications in areas such as crop management, soil fertility, and pest management. In addition to his work with farmers, Nabukenya is an avid writer and has published numerous articles and papers on various agricultural topics.

Agnes Nabukenya
Agnes Nabukenya is a highly experienced Agricultural Extension Officer with over 10 years of experience in the field. He has a deep understanding of farming practices in Kenya and is passionate about helping small-scale farmers improve their crop yields and overall livelihoods. Nabukenya has a Bachelor's degree in Agriculture from Egerton University and a Master's degree in Agricultural Extension from the University of Nairobi. He has also received several certifications in areas such as crop management, soil fertility, and pest management. In addition to his work with farmers, Nabukenya is an avid writer and has published numerous articles and papers on various agricultural topics.
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